Healthy hiking holidays: from Patagonia to Tasmania and Spain’s classic Camino

Hiking in Patagonia, Chile

Last month, I found myself hiking along a section of Chilean Patagonia’s most famous walking route, the W.

The route curls around the Paine Massif, a majestic family of jagged peaks, whose tops were shrouded in cloud and cloaked in snow. Condors hunted between their teeth, and the air jolted to the sound of avalanches, hundreds of meters above me.

It all taps into the recent story I wrote for Prevention magazine, a women’s health publication, about five great hiking holidays. In it, I included the W, but also Tasmania’s new Three Capes Walk and the Larapinta Trail in Australia’s Northern Territory, as well as the Kumano Kodo in Japan and the Spanish classic ultra-long walk, the Camino de Santiago.

Why do we walk? To get fit? To slow down? To go on pilgrimage?

The benefits include better health and spending time in nature, while some walks, like the Kumano Kodo and the Camino, were very deliberately designed to create time to clear your head and sift and sort through the bigger problems in life,  says Di Westaway, founder of Wild Women On Top.

“Finishing a trek that takes you outside your comfort zone is a confidence-building exercise. It might be really arduous at high altitude, with plenty of “OMG, what was I thinking?” moments, but that exhilaration and achievement afterwards is a huge personal lift,” Diane adds.

You can read the story online, or you can just pull your hiking boots on now…

Rise of the regions: new hotels in rural Australia

Rural retreat hunters are spoilt with a swag of stylish new properties away from the bright lights.

We take a look at Kimo Estate in rural NSW and Mt Mulligan Lodge in far north Queensland, where back roads are back, and slow travel establishes as one of today’s key travel trends in a world that never hits the off button.

With plenty of sparse spaces across the country, Australia’s regions have responded to the demand for dalliance – click here to read on for the Rise of the Regions, first published in Essentials Magazine.

How to respect the Reef

Great Barrier Reef, Australia

Recently, I was up on Heron and Hamilton Islands on Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, which is constantly in the news for being beautiful, but also for dying.

In my regular series in the Sydney Morning Herald and The Age’s Traveller section, I chat with experts about travellers’ conundrums, and this trip sparked a column on how to respect the Reef.

The expert is Andy Ridley, creator of the global Earth Hour movement (which asks individuals and businesses to switch off their lights – in the house, in skyscrapers, on the streets – for just one hour). His newest project is Citizens of the Great Barrier Reef,  a network of individuals, organisations and businesses working to conserve the Great Barrier Reef and reefs around the world.

His steps to respecting the reef include:
  • carbon-offsetting your flights
  • using reef-friendly sunscreen
  • visiting the Reef responsibly – using eco-accredited tour companies, not touching coral
  • and promoting the reef: if you see damage, report it. If you find beauty, tell the world.

To read the full article, click here

To become a Citizen, sign up at citizensgbr.org